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Montreal Protocol

Home Eco-innovation Info Environmental Conventions Montreal Protocol

Title Montreal Protocol
Description

Montreal Protocol on Substances That Deplete the Ozone Layer

- The Protocol took effect in January 1989. Professor F.S. Lowland raised the issue of depletion of the ozone layer in 1974, which then emerged as a global issue. The Montreal Protocol was officially signed in Montreal, Canada, in 1986. The Protocol aims to control the production and use of substances that deplete the ozone layer, and covers matters related to the phased reduction of CFC, trade disadvantages for non-adhering countries, and the reassessment of scientific, environmental, technological and economic nformation on regulations at four-year intervals from 1990.

Descriptions

- Only 5 CFC items and 3 Halons were designated as substances to be controlled when the Montreal Protocol took effect, but the need to strengthen regulations for the effective protection of the ozone layer was raised.

- Phased reduction of CFC and trade sanctions on non-adhering countries

- Regulations have been reassessed based on the maximum available scientific, environmental, technological and economic information at four-year intervals since 1990 (different timelines applied to advanced countries and developing countries)

- Substances to Be Controlled: CFCs, HCFCs, Halons, Methyl bromide, Carbon tetrachloride, Methyl chloroform and Bromochloromethane

Substances
Controlled
Advanced
Countries
Developing
Countries
Applications Remarks
CFC-11, 12, 113, 114, 115 Abolished as of 1 January, 1996 (required application excluded) - Based on the average volumes consumed between 1995 and 1997 Frozen as of 1 January, 1999
- Reduced by 50% as of 1 January, 2005
- Reduced by 85% as of 1 January, 2007
- Abolished as of 1 January, 2010
Refrigerant for refrige- rators and air conditioners, and deter- gents for electronic products CFC-11,12, produced by Foosung Co., Ltd. (formerly Ulsan Chemicals)
Halons (3 Items) Abolished as of 1 January, 1994 - Based on the average volumes consumed between 1995 and 1997 Frozen as of 1 January, 2005
- Reduced by 50% as of 1
- January, 2005 Abolished as of 1 January, 2010
Fire extinguishers Halons- 1211,1301, produced by Hanju Chemical
CFC-13 and 10 Items Abolished as of 1 January, 1996 - Based on the average volumes consumed between 1998 and 2000 Reduced by 20% as of 1 January, 2003
- Reduced by 85% as of 1 January, 2007
- Abolished as of 1 January, 2010
Refrigerant mixture
Carbon Chloride Abolished as of 1 January, 1996 - Based on the average volumes consumed between 1998 and 2000 Reduced by 85% as of 1 January, 2007
- Abolished as of 1 January, 2010
CFC and chemical materials and solvents Produced by Samsung Fine Chemicals
Methyl chloroform (1,1,1-TCE) Abolished as of 1 January, 1996 - Based on the average volumes consumed between 1998 and 2000 Frozen as of 1 January, 2003
- Reduced by 30% as of 1 January, 2005
- Reduced by 70% as of 1 January, 2010
- Abolished as of 1 January, 2015
HCFC and metal detergents
40 HCFC Items - Frozen from 1 January, 1996 based on the volume consumed in 1989 Reduced by 35% as of 1 January, 2004
- Reduced by 35% as of 1 January, 2004
- Reduced by 90% starting 1 January 2015 - Abolished starting 1 January, 2030
- Based on the volumes consumed in 2015Frozen starting 1 January, 2016
- Abolished starting 1 January , 2040
Interim alternatives for CFC HCFC-22 141,142, produced by Foosung Co., Ltd. (formerly Ulsan Chemicals)

Adhering Countries

Adhering Countries
Asia
(7 countries)
Mongolia, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Pakistan and the Philippines
Americas
(6 countries)
Guiana, Bahamas, Brazil, Uruguay, Cuba and Peru
Europe
(39 countries)
Greece, Netherlands, Norway, Denmark, Germany, Latvia, Russia, Romania, Luxemburg, Lithuania, Monaco, Montenegro, Moldova, Belgium, Belarus, Bosnia Herzegovi-na, Bulgaria, San Marino, Serbia, Sweden, Switzerland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Armenia, Albania, Estonia, Austria, Ukraine, Yugoslavia, Italy, Georgia, Czech, Croatia, Kyrgyzstan, Portugal, Poland, France, Finland and Hungary
Middle East
and Africa
(18 countries)
South African Republic, Niger, Liberia, Morocco, Bahrain, Senegal, Seychelles, UAE, Azerbaijan, Iran, Israel, Central-African Republic, Zimbabwe, Kenya, Côte d'Ivoire, Congo, Kuwait and Tunisia

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